II Simposio Internacional: Avances en Precáncer Oral

II Simposio Internacional / II International Symposium
Avances en Precáncer Oral
Advances in Oral Precancer

27 y 28 Noviembre 2008 // November 27nd-28nd, 2008
Leioa. España. Spain

img01.jpg

Paraninfo Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología

UNIVERSIDAD DEL PAÍS VASCO / EHU

Servicio Clínica Odontológica
Universidad del País Vasco
Euskal Herriko Unibersitatea

Información/information: roberto.nuno@ehu.es // josemanuel.aguirre@ehu.es

  • Posters y Sesión de Discusión
    Poster and Discussion Session
  • Sesión Clinicopatológica
    Clinicopathological Session
  • Conferencias/Conferences:
    Dr. F. Lozada-Nur
    Dr. S. Gandolfo
    Dr. M. Carozo
    Dr. I. van derWaal
    Dr. P. Holmstrup
    Dr. J.V. Bagán

PROGRAMA PRELIMINAR

27 Noviembre, mañana: Sesión SEMO-AIPMB
Postres Científicos
9.30-10.30 h: Aspectos moleculares en Precánceroral.
Coordinadores: M.A. Martínez de Pancorbo, M.A. González Moles.
10.30-11.30 h: Aspectos clinicopatológicos en Precánceroral.
Coordinadores: A. Martínez-Sahuquillo, J. López.
11.30-12.30 h: Quéenseñar y como enseñar en Precánceroral.
Coordinadores: J. M. Seoane, G. Esparza.
27 Noviembre, tarde: Sesión Clinicopatológica
15.30-18 h: “Casos comprometidos de Precánceroral”.
Coordinadores: A. Bascones, J.M. Gandara, .Casos: Dr. Lozada-Nur, Dr. Bagán, Dr. vander Waal, Dr. Carrozzo, Dr. Gandolfo, Dr. Holmstrup.
28 Noviembre, mañana: Conferencias
-El difícil diagnóstico de las lesiones premalignasorales. Dr. Sergio Gandolfo
-¿Porquénecesitamos diferenciar el liquen plano y las lesiones liquenoides? Dr. Isaäcvan derWaal
-Etiopatogeniade las lesiones orales premalignas. Dr. Marco Carozo
28 Noviembre, tarde:
-La leucoplasia oral proliferativa como reto diagnóstico y terapéutico. Dr. JoséV. Bagán.
-Factores pronósticos en las lesiones orales premalignas. Dr. Palle Holmstrup
-¿Que hay de nuevo en el tratamiento de la premalignidadoral? Dr. Francina Lozada-Nur
*Traducción simultánea ingles-castellano en las sesiones de la tarde del 27 y de la mañana y tarde del 28.
*Para una mayor información contactar por favor con: roberto.nuno@ehu.es // eduardo.estefania@ehu.es // josemanuel.aguirre@ehu.es
*El último día para remitir resúmenes para los Posterses el 15 de Octubre de 2008.
José M. Aguirre
Unidad de Medicina Oral, Patología Oral y Maxilofacial
Servicio Clínica Odontológica
Facultad de Medicina y Odontología
Universidad del País Vasco EHULeioa 48940. Vizcaya. España. (Spain)
josemanuel.aguirre@ehu.es

Immediate Post-Extraction Implants with Aesthetic Restoration

IMMEDIATE POST-EXTRACTION IMPLANTS WITH AESTHETIC RESTORATION

José Manuel Navajas Rodríguez de Mondelo

Full Professor of the Department of Stomatology, University of Granada

Rosa Mª Pulgar Encinas

Associate Professor of the Department of Stomatology, University of Granada

José Manuel Navajas Nieto

Dentist, Master in Implantology, Madrid Complutense University; Master in Oral Surgery, University of Granada

Cristina Lucena Martín

Associate Professor of the Department of Stomatology, University of Granada

Cristina Navajas Nieto

Dentist, “Expert” in Periodontics, University of Granada

Correspondence:

Dr. José M. Navajas Rodríguez de Mondelo
Avd. del Dr. Oloriz 2. 10 ª
18012 Granada España
e-mail: jnavajas@ugr.es

 

Abstract: This study addresses the present state of knowledge on immediate implantation in fresh extraction socket. The author’s selection of the single-piece Q Trinon R implant is explained, reporting clinical cases with a follow-up of around 5 yrs.

Key Words: Immediate post-extraction implants. Immediate post-extraction aesthetics. Q Trinon implants

INTRODUCTION

Placement of an endosseous implant is the current treatment of choice for the prosthetic replacement of missing teeth, regardless of the cause of their loss.i ii Conventional recommended reposition protocols include an initial stage to achieve osseointegration and a second prosthetic stage for tooth replacement. This treatment sequence requires a waiting time that is functionally solved with a removable prosthesis, causing discomfort to the patient or with a temporary bonded crown, increasing the cost. Scientific evidence has demonstrated that immediate implant loading is a valid procedure with predictable success when indicated by the anatomo-functional conditions.[3],[4] [5]

Implants have been placed in oral sockets immediately after extraction since the very beginnings of implantology. Although the two-stage protocol has traditionally been recommended, clinicians are now performing the immediate loading and aesthetics of the immediate socket mplant in response to the aesthetic demands of their patients.[6],[7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12]

In this article, authors propose a variant of the conventional technique and present the outcomes obtained using this approach in clinical cases with 5 yrs of follow-up.

Indications and contraindications

Immediate socket implantation is indicated for anterior tooth losses due to accidental trauma or coronary or root fractures in endodontic teeth without active infectious disease. It is also indicated in cases of dentine cement or internal dentine resorption and advanced periodontal disease provided that there is adequate remnant bone for implant stabilization and aesthetic restoration is essential.

Contraindications are:

  • Uncontrolled diabetes 
  • Coagulation disorders 
  • Allergies to any material used in the procedure 
  • Acute infection 
  • Heavy smoking
  • Drug addiction 
  • Bruxism

  • Impossible apical stabilization of implant 

They are generally placed in the incisor-canine region and premolar group.

Implant selection

All types of commercially available implant have been used in immediate implantation. Two-piece implants (implant + transepithelial abutment) are generally used in two stages:

a) Immediate implantation in fresh socket

b) Prosthetic replacement and implant loading at least 6-8 weeks later. More recently, these implants have also been fitted with a temporary crown, but this procedure is complicated and requires impressions to be taken during surgery, the selection and placement of an abutment, manufacture of the crown and its cementation at least 24 h after implantation.

For this reason, the implant of choice in cases requiring immediate prosthetic replacement will undoubtedly be the one-piece implant, which incorporates both abutment and implant, allowing a temporary crown to be placed in the same surgical act without difficulty.

The main advantages are:

  • Greater resistance

  • Axial transmission of forces

  • High primary stability

  • Possibility of immediate loading

  • Possibility of immediate aesthetics

  • Possibility of creating an adequate emergency profile

  • Impossibility of bacterial colonization between implant and external abutment: no micro-infiltration in the gap area.

  • Lower cost, since no special attachments are required for crown replacement

This type of implant also has some drawbacks:

  • Difficulty of abutment angulation.

  • Difficulty of recovering deteriorated prostheses

  • Difficulty of placing removable prostheses retained by these implants. However, this can also be done using telescopic crowns, and one-piece implants were recently developed that can be screwed to the abutment.

Almost all manufacturers (Fig. 1) offer one-piece implants, including the following (as examples)

img001.jpg
Fig. 1: Different designs of one-piece implants.

Nobel BiocareR: Nobel Direct, Posterior Nobel Direct and Active Nobel
StraummanR: Monotyp e8º; this one-piece implant is recommended by the company for bar prostheses but can also be used for immediate implant due to its screw design
LifecoreR: Prima Solo, a conical, self-screwing implant with gold-coloured abutment to improve the aesthetics.
Apha-bio ImplantsR: ARRP, a one-piece implant available in several diameters
Zimmer DentalR: A recently-developed one-piece implant for immediate loading.
Trinon DentalR: Q implant, an implant tested for immediate loading.

Our group uses the TrinonR Q implant[13] (Fig. 2) for this procedure This one-piece implant has a conical design with a wide spiral of blunt edges and a threaded part for self-screwing and condensation of bone between spirals. The apex has a blunt point to facilitate insertion. It has a 2-4-mm long polished neck and conical abutment with 8º convergence that bears four slots for insertion and to avoid crown rotation when only one tooth is replaced. As demonstrated by Shi et al.,[14] the conical design of the implant, which simulates a natural tooth root, provides a more homogeneous distribution of axial and tangent forces, reducing stress at the bone-implant interface.

 

img002.jpg    img003.jpg
Fig. 2: Single-piece Trinon Q Implant R with polished neck of 2-mm height. Note: a) Space between spirals, b) Threaded part area; c) Blunt point; d) Surface treatment; e) Spiral design after the polished part, which minimises tensions in the cortical area (between arrows). The conical shape and space between spirals optimises the distribution of masticatory forces.   Fig.-2 bis- Scanning electron microscope image of implant surface: a).- Note the bluntness of the spirals, to release tension. b).- Image (1000 X) of the rough part of the implant surface (cavity diameter ranges from 1 to 4 microns).

The surface is acid-etched and sand-blasted with aluminium-oxide (Fig. 2bis). It is manufactured in commercially pure titanium (alloy of titanium, aluminium and vanadium). It is available in three diameters at neck level (3.5 mm, 4.5 mm and 5.5 mm) and in lengths of 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16 mm.

The implant is first inserted by hand or with a drill at very low speed. A manual wrench is used to control, with one-eighth of a turn, insertion of the implant and condensation of the surrounding bone, allowing intraoperative modification of the insertion axis to achieve the optimal position and desired aesthetic outcome. Because of its design, it can be used as an osteotome, allowing the 3.5-mm width implant to be placed in very thin crests with no need for further surgery and achieving exceptional primary stability.

Insertion surgery requires the use of only two conical burs for the 3.5 mm implant and three for the 4.5 mm one. The conical design of the surgical socket and its small size offers important bone saving, minimizing stress and cutting temperature.

As in all titanium implants, osseointegration occurs. Given its high primary stability, a large amount of laminar bone is observed in close union with the treated surface of the implant (Fig. 3)

 

img004.jpg
Fig. 3: Environmental scanning electron microscope image of the transversal section of a recovered Trinon Q implantR. Note: a) Implant surface; b) Close implant-bone binding; c) Compact laminar bone; d) Trabecular bone; e) Osteoplast.

Conditions of extraction previous to immediate implant

The success of immediate implantation in fresh socket and the achievement of favourable aesthetics are largely based on two essential conditions: alveolar bone integrity and absence of infection. The extraction procedure must therefore meet a series of requirements to have a minimal traumatic effect on the receptor tissue and ensure an optimal functional and aesthetic outcome. To this end, it is recommended that:

  • Locoregional or infiltration anaesthesia should be used but never interligamentous anaesthesia, which produces alveolar ischemia.
  • Circular periodontal fibres should be withdrawn with care, using a periosteotome or a 12-B scalpel blade.

  • The ligament space at tooth neck level should be enlarged before luxation. For this purpose, the use of ultrasound with special accessories (as used in PiezosurgeryR, from Mectron) helps to preserve alveolar bone integrity.

  • The root should be carefully luxated, applying axial pressure with new elevators, taking great care to avoid damage to the socket walls. It should be taken into account that the presence of lateral bone determines papillary integrity.

  • Full-thickness flaps should be avoided. Flap elevation causes major bone ischemia, since cortical irrigation takes place via the periosteum. Ischemia may cause the loss of vestibular cortex and threaten implant integration (Figs. 4-5)

img005.jpg 
Figs. 4 and 5: Incorrect extraction of root remnant with exposure of cortex and immediate two-phase implantation. Note exposure of implant during the integration period due to loss of vestibular cortex.

Implant insertion technique

There must be at least 3-4 mm of bone in the apical area of the fresh socket for the implant to be adequately secured. Larger apical areas for fixation are more favourable, since they provide greater primary stability. For this reason, manufacturers supply professionals with 16-mm and even 18-mm implants. After the extraction, and taking great care not to damage the alveolar bone crest or papillary area, a meticulous curettage of the whole socket is performed to remove any possible remnants of granulation tissue. It is recommended to produce a small haemorrhage to favour wound-healing.

 

img006.jpg   img007.jpg
Fig. 6: Diagram of Trinon Q Implant R for immediate implantation in fresh socket, indicating the apical stability and space with no bone contact.     Fig. 7: Diagram showing the fitting of the implant to the size of the post-extraction socket

The implant must be fixed with an insertion force of ≥ 60 Newton/cm2 (Fig. 6). The selection of implant size is determined by the characteristics of the extracted tooth. In general, 4.5-mm implants are used for central incisors and canines, whereas 3.5-mm implants are more commonly used for lower incisors and upper lateral incisors (Fig. 7).

img008.jpg
Figs. 8 and 9: Root remnant with internal dentin resorption and the selected implant (Trinon QR; 4.5 x 12 mm), exceeding the alveolar apex by 4 mm. Note how the implant spirals are anchored in the alveolar cortex thanks its conical design and the width of the spirals.

Implant length is conditioned by the need for stabilization, which requires, as mentioned, at least 4 mm of bone to be available between the apical area of the socket and the anatomic limits (Figs 8 and 9). Implants of 3.5-mm require a greater length to be stable than do those with a larger diameter.

The placement procedure commences with perforation of the socket floor cortex using a pilot drill, initiating the preparation of the implant bed, which must be at the centre of the socket, as equidistant as possible from its distal and mesial walls. Given the high conicity of the implant design, it is not usually necessary to utilise the palatal wall for support, as recommended for cylindrical implants.

 

img009.jpg    img010.jpg
Fig. 10: The direction of the bur can be change if desired.    Fig. 11: Preparation with internal irrigation bur. Note the palate/vestibule incline, centred and parallel to neighbouring teeth.

The direction of the implant bed can be modified when aesthetically or anatomically required (Fig.10). Internal irrigation burs of suitable size for the selected implant are then used. The implant, which has a considerable self-screwing capacity, is first inserted manually, with the possibility of correcting its position if necessary (Fig.12). When more force is needed, we use the insertion wrench, especially designed to allow atraumatic fixing of the implant body (Fig. 13).

 

img011.jpg    img012.jpg
Fig. 12: Manual insertion of implant. Perfect alignment with adjacent teeth, obtaining an excellent problem-free aesthetic outcome. Note the conicity of the implant, of great utility given the anatomical characteristics of the socket.    Fig. 13: The last turns of the screw are done with a manual wrench. The wrench is designed so that the handle must be taken off and put back at every eighth of a turn, allowing stress on the bone to diminish. Note the insertion axis and the design of the wrench.
     
img013.jpg    
Fig. 14: This X-ray provides a perfect image of the part of the implant that is covered by bone and the polished part next to soft tissues.    

The implant is inserted in the socket until its unpolished part is completely covered by bone. The polished part is in contact with soft tissue and, together with the temporary crown, will contribute to achieving a correct biological space, a good emergency profile and a good aesthetic outcome (Fig. 14).

Because of the conical shape of the implant, the free gap between implant and socket is minimal. It has been demonstrated that this space does not need to be filled because. thanks to the high wound-healing capacity of the socket, it will be closed with bone. However, if there is a large gap, a xenograft can be placed with plasma rich in growth factors and fibrin clot. This technique is especially useful in cases of immediate implants in the premolar area where, if there are two sockets, it can enhance wound-healing[15]When the implant is moistened in plasma rich in growth factors, it is endowed with an active surface that facilitates bone integration (Figs. 15 and 16).

 

img014.jpg   img015.jpg
Fig. 15: Socket of upper first premolar with two roots. When the implant is inserted, there will be a large gap between the bone walls and the implant, which should be filled with a graft.   Fig. 16: Mixture of xenograft (Bio-Oss GeistlichnBiomaterials) and plasma rich in growth factors in the above case, before insertion of the implant.

Manufacture of temporary crown

The temporary crown has a highly important role in the success of this type of treatment for the following reasons:

  1. It re-establishes aesthetics immediately, one of the main demands of patients.
  2. It facilitates soft tissue healing
  3. It is essential to establish the emergency profile and allow gingival papilla formation.
img016.jpg
Fig. 17: Diagram of a Trinon Q implant R with socket and soft tissues in comparison to the tooth

The relationship between inserted implant and soft tissue is similar to that between tooth and periodontium. Thus, bone tissue integrates with the treated (rough) area of the implant and conjunctive tissue adapts to the polished area and a small portion of epithelial insertion, while the remaining gingiva is shaped to the artificial crown that we place for creating an adequate emergency profile (Fig. 17). The two differences with natural teeth are: a) conjunctive tissue fibres are bound to the crestal bone and b) vessels that irrigate the internal part of the emergency profile are vertically aligned, since they come from the periosteum, whereas they form a circular plexus in natural teeth (Figs. 18 and 19).

Tarnow et al[16] reported bone remodelling with losses of 1.5-2 mm under the shoulder after abutment insertion in two-piece implants, with a loss of approximately 1.3 mm of bone in crateriform shape. Grunder et al[17] concluded that at least 2 mm of bone (measured laterally) are required to support the gingival profile. The absence of a gap between implant and abutment in Q TrinonR implants hinders bacterial colonization. The other reason that these implants do not generally produce bone loss is that the concavity of the first spiral appears after the polished area, avoiding stress to the alveolar crestal bone (Fig. 2 and 2 bis).

 

img017.jpg   img018.jpg
Fig. 18: Trinon Q implantR before fitting the definitive crown. Note the emergency profile, the physiologic exudate from the polished neck area, the vertical vascular network and the general state of health.   Fig. 19: The above case with the definitive crown in place

With two-piece implants (implant with abutment), the aim is to avoid bone loss by eliminating abutment micromobility, reducing the gap or using an abutment with a diameter smaller than the implant platform[18].

Temporary crown adaptation procedure

Before extraction, alginate impressions are taken from the patient. The prosthetist cuts the tooth to be extracted from the model obtained, forming a slightly over-sized hollow acrylic crown with the colour and aesthetic characteristics indicated by the dentist. The more polished and aesthetic the temporary crown, the better is the outcome. This crown is adapted to the implant abutment using plastic materials for temporary bridges and crowns, followed by the removal of excess material.

After the material is cured, it is carefully polished with composite-polishing discs and wheels. For this purpose, it is very useful to place the crown on a replica of the implant. The degree of polish obtained determines the success of soft tissue healing and achievement of an emergency profile (see Fig 18.) After 8 weeks, an impression of the implant abutment is taken and the final crown is made.

CLINICAL CASES

Case nº 1

A 53-yr-old woman came to the clinic with a root fracture of 23 and active fistula at 2 mm above the gingival margin. Clinical examination demonstrated crown mobility and normality of gingival sulcus. X-ray revealed a well-sealed root treatment and a conical post in the shape of a screw that does not surpass the coronal third of the root. A horizontal fracture was observed at the end of the post.

Diagnosis: Horizontal root fracture with no apical infection (Fig. 20).

Treatment plan: Extraction and immediate prosthetic replacement with implant in fresh socket.

Alginate impressions were taken during the examination and the mould was sent to the dental prosthesis laboratory. Two prostheses were made: an acrylic crown of similar colour and shape to the tooth to be extracted, and a partial removable prosthesis. In cases of immediate post-extraction implantation, it is important to have a partial removable prosthesis prepared. This allows aesthetics to be restored if, after the extraction, it is decided that the implantation should be postponed.

Crown and root remnants were extracted, taking care not to damage alveolar bone structures (see above-mentioned recommendations). Examination of the socket interior with a blunt instrument ensured vestibular bone integrity.

The socket was curetted and a Q TrinonR implant of 4.5 mm width, 14-mm length and 2-mm polished neck was placed, ensuring that the rough part of the implant was completely covered by alveolar bone (Fig. 21). The socket-implant gap was filled with a clot of plasma rich in growth factors. Figures 22, 23, 24 and 25 show the clinical process and outcome, and Figure 25bis depicts the case at almost 5 yrs after treatment.

 

img019.jpg   img020.jpg
Fig. 20: Appearance of area of 23. Active fistula at 2 mm from gingival sulcus.   Fig. 21: Recently inserted Trinon Q implant R. Note the pillar with the entire polished area subgingival and the orientation and equidistance from adjacent teeth. Also note the integrity of the gingival papillae and part of a fibrin clot of the plasma rich in growth factors placed during the implantation
     
img021.jpg   img022.jpg
Fig. 22: Provisional acrylic crown recently fitted on the implant.   Fig. 23 a and b: At three months, impressions are taken and the definitive crown is placed. Note the emergency profile and magnificent state of papillae (vertical vascular plexus can be seen)
     
img023.jpg   img024.jpg
Fig. 24 a and b: The crown when recently fitted (A) and at two years (B). Note periodontal health and good state of papillae. The small ischaemia seen in (B) was produced by pressure of the lip protector on the gingiva.   Fig. 25: Follow-up X-ray at three years. Note the total integration, absence of crestal bone loss, polished area for obtaining the biological space and the emergency profile.
     
img025.jpg    
Fig. 25 bis: Follow-up photograph and X-ray at more than four years: Note the total integration and stability of aesthetic outcome.    

Case nº 2

A 56-yr-old man came to the clinic for mobility in upper left lateral incisor. Clinical history showed a childhood traumatism on the tooth that had been symptom-free in the intervening years. Examination showed the incisor with high mobility to be reddish and to have virtually lost its natural colouring. The X-ray revealed absence of more than two-thirds of the length of the root (Fig.26).

Diagnosis: Severe cementum-dentin resorption.

Treatment plan: Extraction and immediate implantation.

Alginate impressions were immediately taken of both arches and despatched to the dental prosthesis laboratory where, as in the case above, two prostheses were made: a hollow resin crown, and a partial removable crown for immediate aesthetic restoration in case the implantation procedure proved impossible (note the date of the surgery!). Four hours later, extraction and implantation were performed, using plasma rich in growth factors (Fig. 27). Figures 28 and 29 depict the outcome.

 

img026.jpg   img027.jpg
Fig. 26: Cement-dentin resorption. Note change in colour of the crown and mesial and distal diastemas.   Fig. 27: Occlusal view of recently placed Trinon Q implantR in the above case. Note the integrity of the papillae and the depth of its insertion.
     
img028.jpg   img029.jpg
Fig. 28: Recently placed provisional crown. Note the careful nature of the intervention.  

Fig. 29: The definitive crown at five months. The diastemas were preserved to match the original appearance, as expressly requested by the patient.

Case nº 3

A 53-yr-old woman came to the clinic for mobility of upper left incisor. Examination revealed a metal ceramic crown on 21, a small periodontal abscess, mobility and mild pain. The X-ray showed a well-performed root treatment, with no periapical lesion and reconstruction with a metal post, with tangential mesial fracture. It was decided to carefully extract the tooth and insert a Q Trinon implant (14 x 4.5 mm) for immediate aesthetic restoration. Figures 31, 32, and 33 illustrate the entire procedure.

 

img030.jpg   img031.jpg
Fig. 30: Oblique root fracture of 21. Note the small periodontal abscess.   Fig. 31: Recently placed implant. Note its position, the fibrin clot and small remains of BioOss GeistlichnBiomaterials.
     
img032.jpg   img033.jpg
Fig. 32: The provisional crown at one week of placement. The excellent appearance of the soft tissues demonstrates the care taken in the intervention.   Fig. 33: The definitive crown. Note the magnificent aesthetics and the good health of soft tissues.

Case nº 4

A 62 yr-old woman came to the clinic for mobility of lower teeth. Based on clinical and X-ray findings, she was diagnosed with adult periodontitis with loss of bone support. Lower incisors were unviable. Figure 34 shows the clinical and radiographic situation of the patient.

It was decided to extract the lower incisors and place two immediate implants in 32 and 42 for immediate aesthetic restoration. During the implantation, a Bio-Oss GeistlichnBiomaterials graft was placed in sockets of 31 and 41 to maintain the alveolar crest.

Figures 35 and 36 depict the clinical sequence of implantation and prosthetic replacement. Figure 37 shows the outcome after 4 yrs after implanting.

 

img034.jpg   img035.jpg
Fig. 34: Clinical and radiological situation of the patient. Note the appearance of the soft tissues, the opening of the diastemas and the loss of bone support, demonstrating the non-viability of the lower incisors.   Fig. 35 a and b: (a) The situation of two Trinon Q implantsR (3.5 mm x 14 mm) placed after extraction of the incisors. (b) The recently placed provisional fixed prosthesis. A Bio-Oss Geistlichn Biomaterials graft was placed in sockets of 31 and 41 to maintain the architecture of the crest.
     
img036.jpg   img037.jpg
Fig. 36 a and b: (a) Appearance of the implants and gingival tissue before placement of the fixed prosthesis. (b) The recently placed definitive prosthesis. The small irritated area of 32 was because the provisional acrylic crown was oversized.   Fig. 37 a and b: (a) Appearance of the definitive prosthesis at four and five months. (b) Radiographic appearance of implants at four and five months after their insertion. Note the good situation of the implants and area of the Bio-Oss Geistlichn Biomaterials graft in 31-41.

CONCLUSION

The use of one-piece Q Trinon implants is a procedure of predictable success for immediate aesthetics restoration after extraction, providing that the indications reported in this paper are followed.


BIBLIOGRAFIA

[1] Bravi F, Bruschi GB, Ferrini F A 10-year multicenter retrospective clinical study of 1715 implants placed with the edentulous ridge expansion technique. Int J Periodontics Restorative Dent. 2007 Dec;27(6):557-65.
[2] Blanes RJ, Bernard JP, Blanes ZM, Belser UC. A 10-year prospective study of ITI dental implants placed in the posterior region. I: Clinical and radiographic results. Clin Oral Implants Res. 2007 Dec;18(6):699-706.
[3] Becker W, Becker BE, Ricci A, Bahat O, Rosenberg E, Rose LF, Handelsman M, Israelson H. A prospective multicenter clinical trial comparing one- and two-stage titanium screw-shaped fixtures with one-stage plasma-sprayed solid-screw fixtures Clin Implant Dent Relat Res. 2000;2(3):159-65.
[4] Peñarocha M, Carrillo C, Boronat A, Martí E. Early loading of 642 Defcon implants: 1-year follow-up.J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2007 Nov;65(11):2317-20
[5] Avila G, Galindo P, Rios H, Wang HL. Immediate implant loading: current status from available literature. Implant Dent. 2007 Sep;16(3):235-45.
[6] Crespi R, Capparè P, Gherlone E, Romanos GE Immediate occlusal loading of implants placed in fresh sockets after tooth extraction   Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants.  2007 ;22(6):955-62.
[7]  Esposito M, Grusovin MG, Willings M, Coulthard P, Worthington HV   The effectiveness of immediate, early, and conventional loading of dental implants: a Cochrane systematic review of randomized controlled clinical trials. Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants. 2007 Nov-Dec;22(6):893-904.
[8] Susarla SM, Chuang SK, Dodson TBJ Delayed versus immediate loading of implants: survival analysis and risk factors for dental implant failure. Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2008 Feb;66(2):251-5
[9] Cornelini R, Cangini F, Covani U, Wilson TG Jr. Immediate restoration of implants placed into fresh extraction sockets for single-tooth replacement: a prospective clinical study Int J Periodontics Restorative Dent. 2005 Oct;25(5):439-47.
[10] Lindeboom JA, Frenken JW, Dubois L, Frank M, Abbink I, Kroon FH     Immediate loading versus immediate provisionalization of maxillary single-tooth replacements: a prospective randomized study with BioComp implants J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2006 Jun;64(6):936-42.
[11] Vanden Bogaerde L, Rangert B, Wendelhag I. Immediate/early function of Brånemark System TiUnite implants in fresh extraction sockets in maxillae and posterior mandibles: an 18-month prospective clinical study Clin Implant Dent Relat Res. 2005;7 Suppl 1:S121-30.
[12] Paolantonio M, Dolci M, Scarano A, d’Archivio D, di Placido G, Tumini V, Piattelli A Immediate implantation in fresh extraction sockets. A controlled clinical and histological study in man. Periodontol. 2001 Nov;72(11):1560-71.  
[13] Trinon Titanium GMBH . High Quality Titanium .Products P. O. Box 11 14 49D-76137 Karlsruhe Germany .
[14] Shi L, Li H, Fok AS, Ucer C, Devlin H, Horner K. Shape optimization of dental implants .Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants. 2007 Nov-Dec;22(6):911-20.
[15] Liu Y, Li JP, Hunziker EB, de Groot K. Incorporation of growth factors into medical devices via biomimetic coatings Philos Transact A Math Phys Eng Sci. 2006 Jan 15;364(1838):233-48
[16] Tarnow DP,ChoSC,Wallace SS. The efect of inter-implant distance of the height of inter-implant bone crest. J. Periodontol 2000;71: 546-549
[17]  Grunder U, Gracis S, Capelli M.- Influence of 3D bone-to-implant relation-ship on esthetics. J. Periodontics Restorative Dent 2005: 25: 113-119
[18] Lazara RJ, Porter SS.-Platform switching: A new concept in implant dentistry for  controlling postrestorative crestal bone levels. Int. J Periodontics Restorative Dent. 2006:26:9-17.

Implantes Inmediatos Post Extracción con Reposición de la Estética

REDOE – Revista Europea de Odontoestomatologia

IMPLANTES INMEDIATOS POST EXTRACCIÓN CON REPOSICIÓN DE LA ESTÉTICA

José Manuel Navajas Rodríguez de Mondelo

Catedrático del Departamento de Estomatología. Universidad de Granada

Rosa Mª Pulgar Encinas

P rofesora Titular del Departamento de Estomatología. Universidad de Granada

José Manuel Navajas Nieto

Odontólogo. Master en Implantología por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Master en Cirugía Oral por la Universidad de Granada.

Cristina Lucena Martín

Profesora Titular del Departamento de Estomatología. Universidad de Granada

Cristina Navajas Nieto

Odontóloga. Título de “Experto” en Periodoncia por la  Universidad de Granada

Correspondencia:

Dr. José M. Navajas Rodríguez de Mondelo

Avd. del Dr. Oloriz 2. 10 ª

18012 Granada España

e-mail: jnavajas@ugr.es

Resumen: Se hace un estudio del estado actual del conocimiento sobre los implantes inmediatos en alvéolos frescos después de la exodoncia. Se justifica la elección, por los autores, del implante de cuerpo único Q Trinon R y se presentan casos clínicos con aproximadamente 5 años de seguimiento.

Palabras Clave: Implantes inmediatos postextracción. Estética inmediata postextracción. Implantes Q Trinon

INTRODUCCIÓN

La colocación de un implante endoóseo, hoy día, es la técnica de elección para la reposición protética de los dientes perdidos cualquiera que sea la causa de la pérdida.[1] [2] Tradicionalmente los protocolos de reposición aconsejados requerían dos etapas: una inicial para conseguir la oseo-integración y otra, protética, para la reposición de los  dientes. Esta secuencia de tratamiento, requiere un tiempo de espera que, funcionalmente se soluciona con prótesis removible, que supone una incomodidad para el paciente, o con fija provisional adherida que incrementa los costes. La evidencia científica ha puesto de manifiesto que la carga inmediata del implante es un procedimiento válido y de éxito predecible siempre que se den las condiciones anatomo-funcionales que lo indiquen.[3],[4] [5]

La colocación del implante en alvéolos dentarios inmediatamente después de la extracción, ha sido utilizada desde los comienzos de la implantología. Si bien el protocolo en dos etapas ha sido tradicionalmente el aconsejado,  hoy día los requerimientos estéticos de los pacientes inducen a los clínicos a la carga e estética inmediata del implante transalveolar. .[6],[7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12]

En este artículo, los autores proponen una variante de la técnica convencional  mostrando los resultados de esta propuesta en casos clínicos con 5 años de seguimiento

Indicaciones y Contraindicaciones

El implante transalveolar inmediato (postextracción) se indica fundamentalmente en perdidas dentarias  del sector anterior por traumatismos accidentales o fracturas coronarias o radiculares en dientes endodonciados sin patología infecciosa activa. También en las reabsorciones cemento dentinarias o dentinarias internas, y en la enfermedad periodontal avanzada siempre que el remanente óseo sea suficiente para la estabilización del implante y donde la reposición de la estética sea fundamental.

Son contraindicaciones:

  • La diabetes incontrolada
  • Los trastornos de coagulación
  • La alergia a cualquier material de uso
  • La infección aguda
  • El tabaquismo grave (gran fumador)
  • La drogadicción
  • El bruxismo
  • La Imposibilidad de estabilización apical del implante

Se utilizan fundamentalmente en la zona incisiva-canina y en el grupo premolar.

La elección del implante

Todos los tipos de implante disponibles en el mercado han sido utilizados, antes o después, como implante inmediato transalveolar. Los implantes de dos cuerpos (implante + pilar transepitelial), generalmente se utilizan en dos etapas:

            a) Implantación transalveolar

            b) Reposición protésica y carga del implante pasadas, al menos, de 6 a 8 semanas desde su colocación.  Más recientemente estos implantes también se han cargado con una corona provisional, pero el procedimiento es engorroso pues requiere la toma de impresión en el acto operatorio, la elección o colado de un pilar, la fabricación de la corona y el cementado pasadas al menos 24 horas de la implantación.

El implante de elección, por tanto, en aquellos casos en los que se requiera la restitución protésica inmediata, será,  sin duda el implante de cuerpo único, en el que el pilar y el cuerpo del implante constituyen una sola pieza. Esto hace  posible la colocación de la corona provisional en el mismo acto operatorio, sin dificultad.

Entre sus ventajas caben destacar:

  • Mayor resistencia                                                         
  • Transmisión axial de fuerzas
  • Gran estabilidad primaria
  • Posibilidad de carga inmediata
  • Posibilidad de estética inmediata
  • Posibilidad de acondicionar un perfil de emergencia adecuado
  • Imposibilidad de colonización bacteriana entre implante y pilar externo: no se produce microfiltración en la zona del gap.
  • Y menor coste, al no necesitar aditamentos especiales para la reposición de la corona

Este tipo de implantes, también presenta algunas  desventajas:

  •  La dificultad de angulación del pilar.
  •  La dificultad de recuperar prótesis deterioradas
  •  La dificultad de colocación  de prótesis removibles retenidas por  estos implantes. No obstante, es posible también hacerlo mediante coronas telescópicas y, recientemente, hay implantes de un solo cuerpo con posibilidad de atornillar al pilar del mismo.
Casi todos los fabricantes (Fig. 1), disponen de implantes de un solo cuerpo; a modo de ejemplo:

img001.jpg
Fig.1: Diversos diseños de implantes de cuerpo único.

Nobel BiocareR: oferta el  Nobel Direct, el Nobel Direct Posterior y Nobel Active

StraummanR: Esta casa dispone de un implante de un solo cuerpo, el Monotype de 8º y, aunque lo preconiza para prótesis de barra, también puede utilizarse por su diseño de rosca como implante transalveolar

LifecoreR: Dispone de un implante cónico denominado Prima Solo, autoroscante y un pilar de color oro para mejorar el aspecto  estético.

Apha-bio ImplantsR : Ofrece un implante de cuerpo único denominado ARRP, disponible en varios diámetros

Zimmer dentalR: Últimamente oferta un implante para carga inmediata de una sola pieza

Trinon  DentalR: Dispone de su probado implante Q, para carga inmediata

Nuestra elección para esta técnica ha sido el implante Q de TrinonR [13] (Fig. 2) Este implante, de un cuerpo, tiene un diseño cónico, con una espiral ancha de bordes romos y una zona acanalada que permite el autoroscado y la condensación de hueso entre las espiras. Su extremo apical termina en una punta roma, que facilita la inserción. Presenta un cuello pulido de 2 o 4mm de altura y un pilar cónico con una convergencia de 8 grados con cuatro ranuras que sirven para su inserción y para evitar la rotación de las coronas cuando reponen un diente único. El diseño cónico del implante, simulando una raíz dentaria natural, permite, como demostraron  Shi y cols.,[14] una distribución más homogénea de las fuerzas, tanto axiales como tangenciales, disminuyendo el stress en la zona de unión entre el hueso y el implante.

img002.jpg    img003.jpg
Fig. 2: Implante Q Trinon R de cuerpo único y cuello pulido de 2mm de  altura. Obsérvese: a) El espacio entre espiras;  b) La zona acanalada; c) La punta roma; d) El tratamiento de la superficie; e) La escotadura tras la zona pulida que permite minimizar las tensiones en la zona cortical (entre flechas). Su diseño cónico y el espacio entre espiras optimizan la distribución de las fuerzas masticatorias.   Fig.- 2 bis.- Imagen con microscopio electrónico de barrido de la superficie del implante. a).- Véase el contorno romo de las espiras para liberar tensiones. b).- Imagen a 1000 X del aspecto rugoso de la superficie del implante. (el diámetro de las oquedades  varía entre 1 y 4 micras).

La superficie está grabada al ácido y chorreada con óxido de aluminio. (Fig.2 bis). Está fabricado en titanio comercialmente puro (aleación de titanio, aluminio y vanadio) y se fabrica en tres grosores a nivel del cuello, de 3,5mm ,4.5mm y en 5,5mm y en longitudes de 8, 10,12, 14 y 16mm.

El implante se inserta primero a mano o con motor, a muy bajas revoluciones y, posteriormente, mediante una carraca manual que, con un octavo de vuelta, permite controlar la inserción del implante, la condensación ósea a su alrededor y la modificación del eje de inserción en el acto operatorio para adaptarlo a la posición optima y conseguir la estética deseada. Dadas las características de su diseño, puede actuar como un osteotomo, por lo que el de 3.5mm puede colocarse en crestas muy finas, sin necesidad de otras cirugías, consiguiéndose una estabilidad primaria excepcional.


La cirugía de inserción requiere la utilización de solo dos fresas cónicas para el implante de 3.5mm. y de tres para el de 4.5 mm. El diseño cónico del alveolo quirúrgico y su reducido tamaño hace que el ahorro de hueso sea importante, minimizándose el stress y la temperatura del corte.

Como en  todos los implantes de titanio, se produce el fenómeno de la oseointegración. Dada su gran estabilidad primaria, se observa gran cantidad de hueso laminar en unión íntima sobre la superficie tratada del implante (Fig.3)

img004.jpg
Fig. 3: Imagen con Microscopio Electrónico Ambiental, de un corte transversal de un implante Q TrinonR rescatado. Obsérvese: a) Superficie del implante; b) Unión íntima implante-hueso; c) Hueso compacto laminar;  d) Trabécula ósea;  e) Osteoplasto.

Condiciones de la exodoncia previa al implante transalveolar inmediato

El éxito del implante transalveolar y la consecución de una estética favorable se basan, en gran manera, en dos condicionamientos fundamentales: la integridad ósea alveolar y la ausencia de infección. Son necesarios, pues, que se cumplan una serie de requisitos en el acto de la exodoncia,  para que sea minimamente traumática sobre los tejidos receptores a fin de asegurar el éxito del implante tanto desde un punto de vista funcional como estético. Por este motivo se recomienda:

  • .La anestesia debe ser loco regional o infiltrativa, nunca intraligamentosa,  por la isquemia alveolar que provoca.
  •  Ha de hacerse una desinserción cuidadosa de las fibras periodontales circulares, utilizando un periostotomo u hoja de bisturí 12B.
  • La ampliación del espacio del ligamento a nivel del cuello dentario, es muy útil antes de la luxación. Para ello, la utilización de ultrasonidos con aditamentos especiales (como los utilizados por el PiezosurgeryR, de Mectron) ayudan a preservar la integridad ósea alveolar.
  • Hay que hacer una luxación cuidadosa de la raíz, utilizando botadores nuevos con presión axial y sin apoyarse en las paredes de la cortical alveolar vestibular ni en las zonas mesial y distal. Téngase en cuenta que la presencia de soporte óseo lateral condiciona la integridad de las papilas.
  • Evitar la elevación de colgajos de espesor total. La elevación de colgajos provoca una isquemia ósea importante, dado que la irrigación de la cortical se hace a través del periostio. Esta, puede provocar la pérdida de la cortical vestibular y poner en peligro la integración del implante (Figs. 4-5)
img005.jpg 
Figs. 4 y 5: Exodoncia incorrecta de un resto radicular con exposición de la cortical e implante inmediato en dos fases. Obsérvese la exposición del implante durante el periodo de integración por pérdida de la cortical vestibular.

Técnica de inserción del implante

Han de existir, al menos, de tres a cuatro milímetros de hueso en la zona apical del alveolo fresco para que el implante mantenga una fijación adecuada. Zonas de fijación apical mayores son más favorables, dado que permiten una mayor estabilidad primaria. Por esto, los fabricantes ponen a disposición de los profesionales implantes con longitudes de 16 e, incluso, de 18mm. Una vez realizada la exodoncia, con sumo cuidado para no lesionar la cresta alveolar ni la zona papilar, procedemos al legrado cuidadoso de todo el alveolo para eliminar posibles restos de tejido de granulación. Es muy conveniente provocar una pequeña hemorragia del mismo, pues favorecerá la cicatrización.

img006.jpg   img007.jpg
Fig. 6: Esquema de un implante Q TrinonR de inserción transalveolar inmediata. Se esquematiza la estabilidad apical y el espacio sin contacto óseo.     Fig. 7: Esquema de adecuación del implante al tamaño del alveolo post-extracción
El implante ha de quedar fijo al menos con una fuerza de inserción de 60 Newton cm2 (Fig.6). Dependiendo del diente extraído se elige el implante a colocar: en general, los incisivos centrales y los caninos requieren implantes de 4.5mm, mientras que los implantes de 3,5 mm se usan más para los incisivos inferiores y laterales superiores (Fig. 7).

img008.jpg
Figs. 8 y 9: Resto radicular con reabsorción dentinaria interna y el implante elegido (Trinon QR de 4.5 por 12mm) traspasando el ápice alveolar 4 mm. Obsérvese cómo las espiras del implante quedan ancladas en la cortical  del alveolo debido a su diseño cónico y a la amplitud de las mismas.

La longitud del implante está condicionada por la necesidad de estabilizarlo, para lo que se requieren, como hemos dicho, al menos 4mm  de hueso disponible entre la zona apical del alvéolo y los limitantes anatómicos. (Figs 8 y 9). Los implantes de 3.5mm necesitan mayor longitud de estabilización que los de diámetro mayor.

La colocación comienza con la utilización de la fresa piloto en el fondo alveolar que perfora la cortical del alveolo en esta zona. Con ésta se inicia la realización del lecho del implante, teniendo cuidado de que esté centrado dentro del mismo y lo más equidistante de las paredes mesial y distal del alvéolo del diente extraído. Dada la gran conicidad del diseño de este implante no es necesario, en la mayoría de los casos, apoyarse en la pared palatina, como es conveniente con los implantes cilíndricos.

img009.jpg    img010.jpg
Fig. 10: La fresa puede cambiarse de dirección si se cree conveniente.    Fig.11: Preparación con la fresa acanalada de irrigación interna. Préstese atención a la inclinación vestíbulo palatina de la misma, el centrado y el paralelismo con los dientes vecinos.

Cuando los requerimientos estéticos o anatómicos así lo requieran, es posible cambiar la dirección del lecho del implante (Fig.10). Posteriormente se pasan las fresas de irrigación interna del tamaño adecuado al implante elegido. El implante se inserta primero a mano, dada la gran capacidad de auto roscado del mismo, pudiendo corregirse su posición si fuese necesario (Fig.12). Cuando se requiere más fuerza, se utiliza la carraca de inserción. Ésta tiene un diseño especial que permite una fijación atraumática del cuerpo del implante (Fig.13).

img011.jpg    img012.jpg
Fig. 12: Colocación manual del implante. La perfecta alineación con los dientes vecinos, permite una excelente estética sin problemas. Obsérvese la gran conicidad del implante, que lo hace utilísimo dadas las características anatómicas del alvéolo.    Fig. 13: Las últimas vueltas del roscado se hacen con una carraca manual. Ésta, está diseñada de forma que en cada octavo de vuelta que se rosca el implante, hay que retirar el mango y volver a introducirlo, lo que da la posibilidad de que el estrés sobre el hueso disminuya. Obsérvese el eje de inserción y el diseño de la carraca.
     
img013.jpg    
Fig. 14: En esta radiografía se muestra perfectamente la zona  del implante que ha de quedar cubierta por hueso y la zona pulida junto a los tejidos blandos.    

El implante se introduce en el alvéolo hasta que la parte no pulida del mismo quede completamente cubierta por el hueso. La parte pulida, contacta con los tejidos blandos y contribuirá a conseguir, junto con la corona provisional un espacio biológico adecuado, un buen perfil de emergencia y una alta estética (Fig. 14).

El espacio libre que queda entre el implante y el alvéolo, dadas las características cónicas del implante, son mínimas. Se ha demostrado que no es necesario rellenar este espacio para que el gran potencial de cicatrización del alveolo lo cierre con nuevo hueso. No obstante, se puede, en caso de gran discrepancia, colocar un xenoinjerto junto con plasma rico en factores de crecimiento y coágulo de fibrina. Es más útil esta técnica en caso de implantes transalveolares en la zona de premolares, donde, si se tienen dos alvéolos, se facilita la cicatrización[15]. Si se humedece el implante en plasma rico en factores de crecimiento, puede conseguirse una superficie activa en el implante que facilita la integración ósea. (Figs. 15 y 16).

img014.jpg   img015.jpg
Fig.15: Alvéolo de un primer premolar superior con dos raíces. Al insertar el implante, la discrepancia entre paredes óseas y el implante será grande, por lo que es conveniente rellenarla con un injerto.   Fig. 16: Mezcla de xenoinjerto (Bio-Oss GeistlichnBiomaterials) y plasma rico en factores de crecimiento, en el caso anterior, antes de colocar el implante.

Fabricación de la corona provisional

La corona provisional juega un importantísimo papel en el éxito de este tipo de tratamiento porque:

1.      Restablece la estética inmediatamente, que es uno de los requerimientos fundamentales de   los pacientes.

2.      Facilita la curación de los tejidos blandos y…

3.      Es fundamental para condicionar el perfil de emergencia y la formación de las papilas gingivales.

img016.jpg
Fig.17: Representación esquemática de un implante Q TrinonR con el alvéolo y los tejidos blandos, comparados con el diente

Cuando colocamos un implante, la relación de los tejidos blandos con el mismo es similar al diente con su periodonto. La parte ósea se integra en la zona tratada (rugosa) del implante. El conjuntivo se adapta a la zona pulida así como una pequeña porción de inserción epitelial y el resto de la encía se conforma en función de la corona artificial que coloquemos, creando el perfil de emergencia adecuado (Fig.17). Las dos diferencias que existen en relación al diente natural son: que las fibras del conjuntivo se unen a la cresta ósea y que los vasos que irrigan la parte interna del perfil de emergencia se sitúan verticalmente, pues proceden del periostio, a diferencia del diente natural que lo hace en forma de plexo circular (Figs. 18 y 19).

Tarnow y cols[16], demostraron que, tras la inserción del pilar en los implantes de dos piezas, se producía una remodelación ósea con perdida de 1,5 a 2mm por debajo del hombro y, además, se inducía una perdida de aproximadamente 1,3mm en forma crateriforme. Grunder y cols[17] aseguran que se necesitan, al menos, 2mm de hueso medidos lateralmente para soportar el perfil gingival. La ausencia de “gap” entre implante y pilar, en los implantes Q TrinonR, dificulta la colonización bacteriana, lo que unido a que tras la zona pulida aparece la concavidad de la primera espira, hace que estos implantes no presenten, en general, pérdida de hueso, dado que dicha concavidad evita el stress en el hueso de la cresta alveolar (Fig. 2 y 2 bis).
img017.jpg   img018.jpg
Fig. 18: Implante Q Trinon R antes de colocar la corona definitiva. Obsérvese: el perfil de emergencia, el exudado fisiológico procedente de la zona del cuello pulido, la red vascular vertical y el estado general de salud.   Fig. 19: El caso anterior con la corona definitiva colocada.

En los implantes de dos cuerpos (implante y pilar), se trata de evitar la pérdida ósea tratando de eliminar el micromovimiento del pilar, disminuyendo el gap o utilizando un pilar de diámetro menor que la plataforma del implante[18].

Procedimiento  de adaptación  de la corona provisional

Antes de la realización de la exodoncia, se toman unas impresiones del paciente con alginato. El protésico corta, en los modelos obtenidos, el diente que va a ser extraído y fabrica una corona de acrílico algo sobredimensionada y ahuecada en su interior,  con el color y características estéticas indicadas por el odontólogo. Cuanto más pulida y estética sea la corona provisional, mejor serán los resultados que se obtienen. La corona así fabricada se adapta con material plástico para puentes y coronas provisionales sobre el pilar del implante, teniendo cuidado en retirar los excesos de material.

Una vez fraguado el material de rebase se pule cuidadosamente con discos y gomas de pulir composites, siendo muy útil, para hacer esto, colocar la corona sobre una replica del implante. El grado de pulido conseguido condiciona el éxito en la curación de los tejidos blandos y la obtención de un perfil de emergencia como el que se observa en la figura 18.  Pasadas 8 semanas, se toma impresión del pilar del implante y se confecciona la corona definitiva.

CASOS CLÍNICOS

Caso nº 1

Paciente de 53 años de edad, mujer, que acude a nuestra clínica con fractura radicular de 23 y fístula activa dos milímetros por encima del rodete gingival. La exploración clínica pone de manifiesto movilidad de la corona y normalidad en la exploración del surco gingival. Radiográficamente, presenta una endodoncia bien obturada y un perno cónico en forma de tornillo que no sobrepasa el tercio coronal de la raíz. Se aprecia una fractura horizontal a nivel del extremo del perno.

Diagnóstico: Fractura radicular horizontal sin compromiso infeccioso apical.     (Fig. 20).

Plan de tratamiento: Exodoncia y reposición protética inmediata con implante transalveolar.

En el mismo acto de la exploración se toman unas impresiones con alginato que, una vez vaciadas, se envían al laboratorio de prótesis dental. Nos fabrican dos prótesis: Una corona de acrílico de color y forma similar al diente a extraer y una prótesis parcial removible. Es importante en estos casos de implantación inmediata postextracción disponer de una prótesis parcial removible que nos permita restituir la estética en el caso de que, durante la exodoncia, se decida posponer la implantación.

Se realiza la exodoncia de la corona y del resto radicular cuidando no deteriorar las estructuras óseas alveolares, tal y como se ha indicado anteriormente. La exploración del interior del alveolo con un instrumento de punta roma nos asegura la integridad ósea del mismo por vestibular.

Se legra el alveolo y se coloca un implante Q TrinonR de 4.5mm de grosor, 14mm de longitud y 2mm de cuello pulido, cuidando que la zona rugosa del implante quede completamente cubierta por el hueso del alvéolo (Fig. 21). La discrepancia alveolo-implante se rellenó con coágulo de plasma rico en factores de crecimiento. Las figuras 22,23, 24 y 25 muestran el proceso clínico y su evolución y la 25bis, el caso después de casi cinco años desde el inicio  del tratamiento.

img019.jpg   img020.jpg
Fig. 20: Aspecto de la zona del 23. Fístula activa a 2mm del surco gingival.   Fig. 21: Implante Q TrinonR recién insertado. Obsérvese el pilar con toda la zona pulida subgingival, la orientación y la equidistancia de los dientes vecinos. Obsérvese, igualmente, la integridad de las papilas gingivales y parte de un coágulo de fibrina del PRFC que se colocó durante la implantación.
     
img021.jpg   img022.jpg
Fig. 22: La corona acrílica provisional recién colocada sobre el implante.   Fig. 23 a y b: A los tres meses se toman impresiones y se coloca la corona definitiva. Obsérvese el perfil de emergencia y el magnífico estado de las papilas (puede observarse el plexo vascular vertical).
     
img023.jpg   img024.jpg
Fig. 24 a y b: La corona recién colocada (A) y a los dos años (B). Obsérvese la salud periodontal y el buen estado de las papilas. La pequeña isquemia que aparece en (B) es producida por la presión del separador de labios sobre la encía.   Fig. 25: Radiografía de control a los tres años: Obsérvese la total integración y la ausencia de pérdida de hueso crestal, la zona pulida para la obtención del espacio biológico y el perfil de emergencia.
     
img025.jpg    
Fig. 25 bis: Control fotográfico y radiológico pasados más de 4 años: Obsérvese la total integración y el mantenimiento de la estética.    

Caso nº 2

Varón de 56 años, que acude  a la clínica por movilidad del incisivo lateral superior izquierdo. La historia clínica pone de manifiesto un traumatismo infantil sobre el diente que no ha presentado sintomatología durante estos años. En la exploración se observa el incisivo con gran movilidad y un color rojizo con prácticamente pérdida de su coloración natural. Radiográficamente se observa ausencia radicular de más de 2/3 de su longitud (Fig.26).

Diagnóstico: Reabsorción cemento-dentinaria grave.

Plan de tratamiento: Exodoncia e implantación inmediata transalveolar.

Se toman sobre la marcha impresiones de ambas arcadas con alginato  y se mandan al laboratorio de prótesis dental donde, como en el caso anterior, nos fabrican dos prótesis: una corona de resina ahuecada y una parcial removible para que, en el caso de ser imposible con la implantación resolver el problema estético, tengamos opción de resolver protéticamente el caso de forma inmediata.  (Obsérvese la fecha tan significativa de la intervención). A las 4 horas se realiza la exodoncia y la implantación con ayuda de plasma rico en factores de crecimiento (Fig. 27). En las figuras 28 y 29 se aprecia el resultado obtenido.

img026.jpg   img027.jpg
Fig. 26: Reabsorción cemento-dentinaria. Préstese atención al cambio de color de la corona así como los diastemas mesial y distal.   Fig. 27: Vista  oclusal del implante Q TrinonR recién colocado en el caso anterior. La integridad de las papilas y la profundidad de colocación del mismo.
     
img028.jpg   img029.jpg
Fig. 28: La corona provisional recién colocada. Apréciese el cuidado de la intervención.  

Fig. 29: La corona definitiva a los cinco meses. Se han mantenido los diastemas para simular la situación original por el expreso deseo del paciente.

Caso nº 3

Mujer de 53 años de edad que acude a la clínica por movilidad del incisivo superior izquierdo.  En  la exploración se observa una corona metal cerámica en el 21, un pequeño absceso periodontal, movilidad y dolor leve. Radiográficamente, observamos una endodoncia bien realizada, sin lesión periapical y una reconstrucción con perno metálico, con línea de fractura tangencial mesial. Se decide la exodoncia cuidadosa, y la implantación de una fijación Q Trinon de 14mm por 4.5, con reposición inmediata de la estética. En las figuras 31, 32, y 33 se puede observar el procedimiento completo.

img030.jpg   img031.jpg
Fig. 30: Fractura radicular oblicua del 21. Préstese atención al pequeño absceso periodontal.   Fig. 31: El implante recién colocado. Obsérvese la posición del mismo, el coágulo de fibrina, así como pequeños restos de Bio-Oss GeistlichnBiomaterials.
     
img032.jpg   img033.jpg
Fig. 32: La corona provisional a la semana de su colocación. La excelente apariencia de los tejidos blandos pone de manifiesto el cuidado de la intervención.   Fig. 33: La corona definitiva. Obsérvese la magnífica estética y salud de los tejidos blandos.

Caso nº 4

Mujer de 62 años que acude a consulta para tratamiento de la movilidad de sus dientes inferiores. De su exploración clínica y radiográfica se diagnóstica como periodontitis crónica del adulto con pérdida de soporte óseo. Los incisivos inferiores son inviables. En la Fig. 34 se puede apreciar la situación clínica y radiográfica de la paciente.

Se decide exodoncia de los incisivos inferiores  y la colocación de dos implantes inmediatos en situación 32 y 42, para la reposición inmediata de la estética. Durante la implantación, se coloca injerto de Bio-Oss GeistlichnBiomaterials en los alvéolos de 31 y 41, para el mantenimiento de la cresta alveolar.

En las figuras 35 y 36 se puede observar la secuencia clínica de la implantación y reposición protética y en la 37 el resultado después de más de 4 años de la implantación.

cla

img034.jpg   img035.jpg
Fig. 34: Situación clínica y radiográfica de la paciente. El aspecto de los tejidos blandos, la apertura de diastemas y la pérdida de soporte óseo ponen de manifiesto la inviabilidad de los incisivos inferiores.   Fig. 35 a y b: En (a) se observa la situación de los dos implantes Q TrinonR de 3.5 por 14mm de longitud, colocados tras la exodoncia de los incisivos. En (b) la prótesis fija provisional recién colocada. Para mantener la arquitectura de la cresta se colocó un injerto de Bio-Oss Geistlichn Biomaterials en los alvéolos de 31 y 41.
     
img036.jpg   img037.jpg
Fig. 36 a y b: En (a) aspecto de los implantes y tejido gingival antes de colocar la prótesis fija; en (b), la prótesis definitiva recién colocada. La pequeña zona irritada del 32 es debida a sobredimensión de la corona acrílica provisional.   Fig. 37 a y b: En (a) aspecto de la prótesis definitiva a los cuatro años y cinco meses; en (b), aspecto radiográfico de los implantes a los cuatro años y cinco meses de su inserción. Obsérvese la buena situación de los implantes y la zona del injerto de Bio-Oss Geistlichn Biomaterials en 31-41

Conclusión

La utilización de los implantes Q Trinon de un solo cuerpo es un procedimiento de éxito predecible para la reposición inmediata de la estética tras la exodoncia, siempre que se usen bajo las indicaciones expresadas en este artículo.


BIBLIOGRAFIA

[1] Bravi F, Bruschi GB, Ferrini F A 10-year multicenter retrospective clinical study of 1715 implants placed with the edentulous ridge expansion technique. Int J Periodontics Restorative Dent. 2007 Dec;27(6):557-65.
[2] Blanes RJ, Bernard JP, Blanes ZM, Belser UC. A 10-year prospective study of ITI dental implants placed in the posterior region. I: Clinical and radiographic results. Clin Oral Implants Res. 2007 Dec;18(6):699-706.
[3] Becker W, Becker BE, Ricci A, Bahat O, Rosenberg E, Rose LF, Handelsman M, Israelson H. A prospective multicenter clinical trial comparing one- and two-stage titanium screw-shaped fixtures with one-stage plasma-sprayed solid-screw fixtures Clin Implant Dent Relat Res. 2000;2(3):159-65.
[4] Peñarocha M, Carrillo C, Boronat A, Martí E. Early loading of 642 Defcon implants: 1-year follow-up.J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2007 Nov;65(11):2317-20
[5] Avila G, Galindo P, Rios H, Wang HL. Immediate implant loading: current status from available literature. Implant Dent. 2007 Sep;16(3):235-45.
[6] Crespi R, Capparè P, Gherlone E, Romanos GE Immediate occlusal loading of implants placed in fresh sockets after tooth extraction   Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants.  2007 ;22(6):955-62.
[7]  Esposito M, Grusovin MG, Willings M, Coulthard P, Worthington HV   The effectiveness of immediate, early, and conventional loading of dental implants: a Cochrane systematic review of randomized controlled clinical trials. Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants. 2007 Nov-Dec;22(6):893-904.
[8] Susarla SM, Chuang SK, Dodson TBJ Delayed versus immediate loading of implants: survival analysis and risk factors for dental implant failure. Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2008 Feb;66(2):251-5
[9] Cornelini R, Cangini F, Covani U, Wilson TG Jr. Immediate restoration of implants placed into fresh extraction sockets for single-tooth replacement: a prospective clinical study Int J Periodontics Restorative Dent. 2005 Oct;25(5):439-47.
[10] Lindeboom JA, Frenken JW, Dubois L, Frank M, Abbink I, Kroon FH     Immediate loading versus immediate provisionalization of maxillary single-tooth replacements: a prospective randomized study with BioComp implants J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2006 Jun;64(6):936-42.
[11] Vanden Bogaerde L, Rangert B, Wendelhag I. Immediate/early function of Brånemark System TiUnite implants in fresh extraction sockets in maxillae and posterior mandibles: an 18-month prospective clinical study Clin Implant Dent Relat Res. 2005;7 Suppl 1:S121-30.
[12] Paolantonio M, Dolci M, Scarano A, d’Archivio D, di Placido G, Tumini V, Piattelli A Immediate implantation in fresh extraction sockets. A controlled clinical and histological study in man. Periodontol. 2001 Nov;72(11):1560-71.  
[13] Trinon Titanium GMBH . High Quality Titanium .Products P. O. Box 11 14 49D-76137 Karlsruhe Germany .
[14] Shi L, Li H, Fok AS, Ucer C, Devlin H, Horner K. Shape optimization of dental implants .Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants. 2007 Nov-Dec;22(6):911-20.
[15] Liu Y, Li JP, Hunziker EB, de Groot K. Incorporation of growth factors into medical devices via biomimetic coatings Philos Transact A Math Phys Eng Sci. 2006 Jan 15;364(1838):233-48
[16] Tarnow DP,ChoSC,Wallace SS. The efect of inter-implant distance of the height of inter-implant bone crest. J. Periodontol 2000;71: 546-549
[17]  Grunder U, Gracis S, Capelli M.- Influence of 3D bone-to-implant relation-ship on esthetics. J. Periodontics Restorative Dent 2005: 25: 113-119
[18] Lazara RJ, Porter SS.-Platform switching: A new concept in implant dentistry for  controlling postrestorative crestal bone levels. Int. J Periodontics Restorative Dent. 2006:26:9-17.

Noticias de la Sociedad Española de Odontología Infantil Integrada (SEOII)

NOTICIAS DE LA SOCIEDAD ESPAÑOLA DE ODONTOLOGÍA INFANTIL INTEGRADA (SEOII)

img1.jpg
Con una participación de más de 200 asistentes, en el Centro Cultural “Cajasol” de la ciudad de Sevilla, se celebró, el día 8 de marzo de 2008, el V Encuentro Multidisciplinar de Odontología Infantil Integrada y Pediatría Extrahospitalaria y Atención Primaria.

Con este motivo, la SEOII, quiere comunicar y presentar, en primer lugar, sus más sinceras disculpas a todos aquellos profesionales y estudiantes que, pese haberlo solicitado, no pudieron ser admitidos en este Encuentro debido a la limitación del aforo.

En esta ocasión, dicho Encuentro SEOII-SEPEAP, estuvo constituido por dos mesas redondas con debate: “Alimentación en el niño” y “Prevención y tratamiento de la maloclusión en dentición temporal”.

Abrió la sesión la Dra. Antonia Domínguez Reyes, presidenta de la SEOII, dando la bienvenida a todos los dictantes y público en general; comunicó la concesión de créditos de Formación Continuada y Libre Configuración curricular y expresó su deseo de un buen aprovechamiento de todos los conocimientos a impartir durante la jornada.

La mesa redonda “Alimentación en el niño” fue moderada por la Dra. Elena Barbería (Catedrático de la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Odontopediatra y asesora de la SEOII) y tuvo la participación de: Dr. José del Pozo (Pediatra extrahospitalario de Sevilla y director de la revista Pediatría Integral) con el tema Alimentación complementaria del lactante (Beikost); el Dr. Cristóbal Coronel (Especialista en Pediatría en el Centro de Salud Sevilla y tutor de médicos pediatras SAS) que habló sobre la Alimentación preescolar y escolar; el Dr. Aníbal González (Profesor Titular de la Universidad de Sevilla responsable de la Odontología Preventiva y Comunitaria) con el tema Repercusiones sobre el aparato estomatognático de la alimentación del niño; el Dr. Elías Casals (Profesor Asociado de la Universidad de Barcelona colaborador en Odontología Preventiva y Comunitaria, y vicepresidente de la SESPO) con el tema ¿Qué consejos dietéticos debemos dar en el siglo XXI?; y cerró la mañana el Dr. José Chamizo (Doctor Honoris Causa por la Universidad Pablo de Olavide de Sevilla y Defensor del Pueblo Andaluz) el cual expuso el tema Atención de los menores en los comedores escolares. Perspectiva del Defensor del Pueblo Andaluz.

Finalizada la mesa se realizó un extenso debate, que contó con las aportaciones del Dr. José Luis Bonal (Pedriatra extrahospitalario y presidente de la SEPEAP) y el Dr. Eugenio Cabrera (Médico de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria y asesor de la SEOII) y sirvió para que cada uno de los ponentes pudiera esclarecer las dudas que los asistentes pusieron en manos de la presidenta de la mesa y que evidenció la buena preparación de los pediatras en esta rama sanitaria de la alimentación y la necesidad de que aumente su importancia en los estudios de odontología. La moderadora, Profa. Dra. Elena Barbería tuvo unas palabras de recuerdo para el Prof. Dr. Juan Pedro Moreno González en los 15 años de su fallecimiento, siendo expresado un sentimiento unánime de afecto con una salva de aplausos.

img2.jpgimg3.jpg

La mesa redonda “Prevención y tratamiento de la maloclusión en dentición temporal”, moderada por la Dra. Antonia Domínguez (Profesora Titular de la Universidad de Sevilla, responsable de la Odontología Infantil Integrada y presidenta de la SEOII), contó con la participación del Dr. Carlos O’Connor (Profesor Asociado de la Universidad de Sevilla, responsable de la ORL en ella y en el Hospital USP de Marbella) quien disertó sobre la Influencia de las vías aéreas sobre el desarrollo del aparato estomatognático; la Dra. Laura García (Foniatra, Profesora Asociada de la Universidad de Sevilla, responsable de la rehabilitación en la Facultad de Medicina y Jefa del Servicio de Rehabilitación del Hospital VM de Sevilla) con el tema Equilibrio – desequilibrio miofuncional. Tratamiento interdisciplinar; la Dra. Mercedes Gálvez (Doctora en Odontología por la Universidad de Granada y vocal de la SEOII) con el tema Oclusión y maloclusión. D. Cleofás Rodríguez (Licenciado en Kinesiología y Fisiatría, Máster en Osteopatía y profesor Colaborador de la Universidad de Sevilla, responsable de la Fisioterapia) expuso el tema Correlación de la postura con la oclusión dental; y cerró la sesión el Dr. José Antonio Gámez (Asesor del Área de Salud y Dependencia del Defensor del Pueblo Andaluz y profesor Colaborador en la Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública) con el tema El derecho a la atención bucodental en el niño.

Finalizada la mesa se realizó de nuevo un gran debate que sirvió para que cada uno de los ponentes pudiera aportar aún mayores conocimientos a los temas tratados, a la vez que se mantenía un interesante y fluido coloquio de preguntas y respuestas entre estos, moderadora y asistentes.

La conferencia de clausura estuvo a cargo del Dr. Fernando Malmierca (Médico especialista en Pediatría en el Hospital Universitario de Salamanca y expresidente de la SEPEAP, con el tema Salud bucodental en el niño y política sanitaria; tema en el demostró estar muy bien informado al aportar los datos correspondientes a la atención pública en Salud Oral en las diferentes regiones peninsulares. El debate se fue realizando a medida que iba presentando los datos estadísticos, pudiendo el público asistente presentar, en todo momento sus opiniones y sus propias experiencias.

Agradeciendo a todos su participación, cerró el acto la propia presidenta de la SEOII, expresando el deseo de que tantos los asistentes, como las más de 60 personas que no pudieron asistir por causa del mencionado aforo, volviéramos a encontrarnos en el VI Congreso de la SEOII que, en el 2009, se celebrará en la ciudad de Granada. Congreso que presidirá la Dra. Mercedes Gálvez.

img4.jpg

Prof. Dr. José M. Ustrell
Vicepresidente de la SEOII